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First people in Europe

First people in Europe

Level 1:

People find something amazing in Britain. They find very old human footprints. The footprints are very special. They are the oldest footprints in Europe. Older footprints are only in Africa.

Scientists take pictures of the footprints. They use the pictures to make a model. There’s a conference in London. The pictures and the model are shown there. Most of the footprints are children’s.

This is a great discovery. It gives us new information. We will understand history better.

Difficult words: amazing (rare and special), footprint (picture of a human foot in the ground), scientist (clever person who is an expert in something), model (small object that shows what something looks like), discovery (something which is found).

Level 2:

The oldest human footprints in Europe have been discovered in Britain. There are only three other sets of footprints that are older and they are in Africa.

Scientists took digital photographs of the footprints and created a 3D image from them. The images and model were unveiled at a news conference at the British Museum in London. Scientists think that most of the footprints are children’s. There was at least one adult, too.

Discoveries of ancient man’s footprints are extremely rare. Scientists say that the discovery will rewrite our understanding of human occupation of Britain and Europe.

Difficult words: digital (electronic), 3D image (picture that looks like an actual object), unveil (show), occupation (living there).

Level 3:

People discovered the oldest human footprints outside of Africa in Britain, dating back around a million years, making these footprints incredibly important finds. People found them on a beach on the Norfolk coast in the east of England, and they are direct evidence of the earliest known humans in Northern Europe.

People first discovered the prints in May 2013 during low tide after the sand had eroded to reveal hollows resembling human footprints. Scientists recorded the surface using photogrammetry, which is a technique that can stitch together digital photographs to create a permanent record and a 3D image of an imprint. People then unveiled the images and a model at a news conference at the British Museum in London.

Scientists now say that the amazing discovery will rewrite our understanding of human occupation of Britain and Europe.

Difficult words: hollow (a hole), resemble (be similar to), stitch (put together), unveil (show), occupation (living somewhere).

 

 

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